Blog — Heart Health
An Avocado a Day Can Improve LDL Levels if You Struggle with Weight Gain

An Avocado a Day Can Improve LDL Levels if You Struggle with Weight Gain 0

One avocado a day is enough to effectively lower your cholesterol, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. The results of this study show that it takes only about a week of eating one avocado a day, in conjunction with a healthy, moderate fat diet, to lower LDL cholesterol levels.1
Here’s What Your Target LDL Level Should Be — Even if You’ve Had a Heart Attack

Here’s What Your Target LDL Level Should Be — Even if You’ve Had a Heart Attack 0

According to research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, reducing LDL levels to an average of 81 with high-dose statins cuts risk for major coronary events—even for those who have had a heart attack in the past.
Meat Lovers Looking to Reduce Cholesterol Should Avoid These Five Red Meats

Meat Lovers Looking to Reduce Cholesterol Should Avoid These Five Red Meats 0

Research has shown that following a strict vegetarian diet can reduce and even negate some damage done to your heart and arteries. However, not all people find the switch an easy one to make. If you’re working to cut meat from your diet without giving up all your favorite cuts, you can strategically choose which types to avoid.
Are You at Risk for Heart Disease? Take This Quiz to See.

Are You at Risk for Heart Disease? Take This Quiz to See. 0

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute developed an updated online tool to help decide your 10-year risk for heart disease. This tool takes into account things you can’t control, such as age and gender, as well as those things you can control, such as cholesterol and smoking habits. These factors are based on the most current health standards from the Framingham Heart Study.
African-Americans Face Disproportionate Risks for Heart Attack and Stroke

African-Americans Face Disproportionate Risks for Heart Attack and Stroke 0

For the first time, cardiovascular health guidelines released in 2013 give doctors an accurate formula to use in calculating heart attack and stroke risk for African-Americans—who face different risks for each. New guidelines allow doctors to evaluate heart risks and stroke at the same time, rather than using two separate figures to gauge a person’s overall risk. Additionally, the updated guidelines are not solely based on research from a predominantly white test population.
25% of Your Blood Cholesterol Comes from the Food You Eat

25% of Your Blood Cholesterol Comes from the Food You Eat 0

High cholesterol is not a totally uncontrollable health factor. In fact, as much as 25% of your blood cholesterol comes from the food you eat, according to the FDA. Your liver and other cells produce the other 75% of your blood cholesterol.